Welcome to theWord Bibles!

This website is dedicated to Bible modules for the program theWord, e-Sword, and MySword. Each Bible will have a post dedicated to it, and over time I will be adding evaluations for each Bible. The individual Bibles will be added so that the post will have downloads for all three Bible programs (I am searching and converting them for all three programs).

To search on a specific Bible, use the search function at top right. To search by type of Bible, use the menu at right. Note that as I study these different Bibles, they may move from one category to another as I deem right. Personally I would only recommend Word-for-Word, and besides their translation theory, there are other considerations about using or not using a particular version.

theWord Bible Reading Plans (below)

KJV21

The 21st Century King James Version of the Holy Bible (KJ21®) is an accurate updating of the King James Version (KJV) of A.D. 1611. While easier to read and understand, it preserves the traditional Biblical language and sacred message of its historic predecessor. The KJ21® is the solution for Bible readers who love beautiful, reverent language yet want accuracy, clarity of meaning, and reading ease. Description from http://www.kj21.com/

The Lamsa Bible (translated from Peshitta)

The Lamsa Bible (translated from Peshitta)

The Lamsa Bible 1933

This translation of the Old and New Testaments is based on Peshitta manuscripts which have comprised the accepted Bible of all those Christians who have used Syriac as their language of prayer and worship for many centuries. Syriac is the literary dialect of Aramaic. From the Mediterranean east into India, the Peshitta is still the Bible of preference among Christians. George M. Lamsa, the translator, devoted the major part of his life to this work. He was an Assyrian and a native of ancient Bible lands. He and his people retained Biblical customs and Semitic culture, which had perished elsewhere. With this background and his knowledge of the Aramaic (Syriac) language, he has recovered much of the meaning that has been lost in other translations of the Scriptures. Manuscripts used were the Codex Ambrosianus for the Old Testament and the Mortimer-McCawley manuscript for the New Testament. Comparisons have been made with other Peshitta manuscripts, including the oldest dated manuscript in existence. The term Peshitta means straight, simple, sincere and true, that is, the original. Even the Moslems in the Middle East accept and revere the Peshitta text. Although the Peshitta Old Testament contains the Books of the Apocrypha, this edition has omitted them.

Continue reading

Septuagint

Septuagint

The Septuagint

Sometime between the 4th and the 1st century BCE, Jewish scholars, in an attempt to broaden the reach of the Jewish Bible, translated the bible into Greek, producing the_Septuagint. Due both to the process of translation as well as the source material, this translation resulted in extra books being added to the canon which are not generally recognized by Orthodox Jews or Protestant Christian Churches. The Septuagint is one of the main sources for the Greek authors of the New Testament. Continue reading

Alford’s Greek New Testament

The Greek Testament

by Henry Alford

Critics about the Greek New Testament

James Rosscup writes that Alford’s series on the New Testament “contains much that is valuable in the Greek New Testament…though all of the Greek New Testament words have been changed to English throughout.”

John Piper writes “When I’m stumped with a…grammatical or syntactical or logical [question] in Paul, I go to Henry Alford. Henry Alford…comes closer more consistently than any other human commentator to asking my kinds of questions.”

Charles Haddon Spurgeon writes that this text “is an invaluable aid to the critical study of the text of the New Testament. You will find in it the ripened results of a matured scholarship, the harvesting of a judgment, generally highly impartial, always worthy of respect, which has gleaned from the most important fields of Biblical research, both modern and ancient, at home and abroad. You will not look here for any spirituality of thought or tenderness of feeling; you will find the learned Dean does not forget to do full justice to his own views, and is quite able to express himself vigorously against his opponents; but for what it professes to be, it is an exceedingly able and successful work. The later issues are by far the most desirable, as the author has considerably revised the work in the fourth edition. What I have said of his Greek Testament applies equally to Alford’s New Testament for English Readers, which is also a standard work.” (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors’ College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

taken from preceptaustin.org

Alford's Greek New Testament
Alford's Greek New Testament
alford.nt
Version: 2
3.2 MiB
384 Downloads
Details

Douay-Rheims Bible, Challoner Revision

Douay-Rheims Bible, Challoner Revision

Module version: 1.1
Description: The Holy Bible, translated from the Latin Vulgate, diligently compared with the Hebrew, Greek, and other editions in divers languages.

This Bible is the official Bible of the Roman Catholic Church.

DRC Douay-Rheims Bible, Challoner Revision
3.9 MiB
343 Downloads
Details

american-king-james-version-(1999)

The American King James Version is a new English edition of the Holy Bible by Michael Peter (Stone) Engelbrite, based on the King James Version. According to Engelbrite, it is a simple word-for-word update from the King James English. Care has been taken to change nothing doctrinally, but to simply update the spelling and vocabulary. The grammar has not been changed to avoid altering the doctrine.

Engelbrite has put the American King James version of the Bible into the public domain on November 8, 1999. In a note distributed with the translation, he stated, “You may use it in any manner you wish: copy it, sell it, modify it, etc. You can’t copyright it or prevent others from using it. A special thanks to Tye Rausch and Eve Engelbrite who helped tremendously on this project. You can’t claim that you created it, because you didn’t.”[1]

-Wikipedia