Welcome to theWord Bibles!

This website is dedicated to Bible modules for the program theWord, e-Sword, and MySword. Each Bible will have a post dedicated to it, and over time I will be adding evaluations for each Bible. The individual Bibles will be added so that the post will have downloads for all three Bible programs (I am searching and converting them for all three programs).

To search on a specific Bible, use the search function at top right. To search by type of Bible, use the menu at right. Note that as I study these different Bibles, they may move from one category to another as I deem right. Personally I would only recommend Word-for-Word, and besides their translation theory, there are other considerations about using or not using a particular version.

theWord Bible Reading Plans (below)

Modern King James Version

When people search for “modern King James Version,” they are searching for either “Is there a more modernized version of the KJV?” or “What is the Modern King James Version?” referring specifically to the Bible translation known as the MKJV.

To the question “Is there a more modernized version of the KJV?” the answer is a definite “yes.” There are numerous attempts to modernize the language used in the King James Version. The two most well known are the New King James Version and the 21st Century King James Version. Beyond those two, there are also the Third Millennium Bible, the American King James Version, the Updated King James Version, the New Authorized Version, the King James Version—Corrected Edition, and many others. Most recently, the Modern English Version was released in 2014. Description from https://gotquestions.org/Modern-King-James-Version-MKJV.html

Bible in Basic English (BBE)

Bible in Basic English – History
The Bible in Basic English was translated by Professor Samuel Henry Hooke (1874-1968), an English scholar and Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Studies at the University of London. The BBE was printed in 1965 by Cambridge Press in England. Published without any copyright notice and distributed in America, this work fell immediately and irretrievably into the public domain in the United States. from https://gotquestions.org/Bible-Basic-English-BBE.html

J.B. Phillips New Testament

J.B. Phillips (1906-1982) was well-known within the Church of England for his commitment to making the message of truth relevant to today’s world. Phillips’ translation of the New Testament brings home the full force of the original message. The New Testament in Modern English was originally written for the benefit of Phillips’ youth group; it was later published more widely in response to popular demand. The language is up-to-date and forceful, involving the reader in the dramatic events and powerful teaching of the New Testament. It brings home the message of Good News as it was first heard two thousand years ago.-BibleGateway

Thomson Translation

Charles Thomson’s Translation of the Old Covenant is a direct translation of the Greek Septuagint version of the Old Testament into English, rare for its time. The work took 19 years to complete and was originally published in 1808. Thomson is credited with having created the work with little to no help from other scholars. Charles Thomson was a Greek scholar, and before the American Revolution, had been a teacher at several prominent schools. Thomson’s translation of the entire Greek Bible, excluding the Apocrypha, was published in one-thousand sets of four volumes each, the fourth volume being Thomson’s translation of the New Testament in that same year. The printer was Jane Aitken of Philadelphia.[1]

Thomson’s was the first English translation of the Septuagint published, and was considered by British biblical scholars to represent the best in American scholarship. David Daniell, in his compendious work The Bible in English (2003), states that the scholars who worked on the Revised Version in England (1881) consulted Thomson’s translations (among others, of course) during their work. Thomson’s translation of the New Covenant/Testament is the first American translation of the New Covenant.-Wikipedia

King James 2000 (KJ2000)

The idea for the King James 2000 version was conceived in the mind of the editor over 50 years ago. It is written especially for those who have memorized and want to preserve the tradition and beauty of the King James Version–Robert A. Couric

KJV21

The 21st Century King James Version of the Holy Bible (KJ21®) is an accurate updating of the King James Version (KJV) of A.D. 1611. While easier to read and understand, it preserves the traditional Biblical language and sacred message of its historic predecessor. The KJ21® is the solution for Bible readers who love beautiful, reverent language yet want accuracy, clarity of meaning, and reading ease. Description from http://www.kj21.com/

The Lamsa Bible (translated from Peshitta)

The Lamsa Bible (translated from Peshitta)

The Lamsa Bible 1933

This translation of the Old and New Testaments is based on Peshitta manuscripts which have comprised the accepted Bible of all those Christians who have used Syriac as their language of prayer and worship for many centuries. Syriac is the literary dialect of Aramaic. From the Mediterranean east into India, the Peshitta is still the Bible of preference among Christians. George M. Lamsa, the translator, devoted the major part of his life to this work. He was an Assyrian and a native of ancient Bible lands. He and his people retained Biblical customs and Semitic culture, which had perished elsewhere. With this background and his knowledge of the Aramaic (Syriac) language, he has recovered much of the meaning that has been lost in other translations of the Scriptures. Manuscripts used were the Codex Ambrosianus for the Old Testament and the Mortimer-McCawley manuscript for the New Testament. Comparisons have been made with other Peshitta manuscripts, including the oldest dated manuscript in existence. The term Peshitta means straight, simple, sincere and true, that is, the original. Even the Moslems in the Middle East accept and revere the Peshitta text. Although the Peshitta Old Testament contains the Books of the Apocrypha, this edition has omitted them.

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Septuagint

Septuagint

The Septuagint

Sometime between the 4th and the 1st century BCE, Jewish scholars, in an attempt to broaden the reach of the Jewish Bible, translated the bible into Greek, producing the_Septuagint. Due both to the process of translation as well as the source material, this translation resulted in extra books being added to the canon which are not generally recognized by Orthodox Jews or Protestant Christian Churches. The Septuagint is one of the main sources for the Greek authors of the New Testament. Continue reading